Drug detection course for law enforcement cancelled in Hiawassee

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ARIDE training

HIAWASSEE, Ga. – Advanced Roadside Impairment Detection Enforcement (ARIDE) training was cancelled this week due to a lack of law enforcement officers who enrolled in the two-day course, scheduled to take place in downtown Hiawassee. A total of 13 participants from surrounding areas, including four Hiawassee Police Department officers, planned to take part in the drug detection training. The Georgia Public Safety Training Center (GPSTC) required a minimum of 15 enrolled officers, however, to hold the course.

According to information received from GPSTC, no Towns County Sheriff’s Office deputies signed up for the class.

In late March, Hiawassee Police Department announced their intention to host the training, May 23 – 24, held at Hiawassee City Hall. The 16-hour course was designed to enhance law enforcement officers’ ability to recognize psychophysical and clinical indicators of impairment consistent with a subject who is under the influence of drugs, or a combination of drugs and alcohol, while taking appropriate action.

“A training officer with the Georgia Public Safety Training Center in Forsyth, GA contacted Sgt. Travis Gibson with the Clayton Police Department, seeking a location in North Georgia to host the class” Hiawassee Police Chief Paul Smith told FYN in March. “Sgt. Gibson, a part time officer with Hiawassee Police Department, requested the use of the Training Room at the Hiawassee City Hall for the two day course. The class is open to all law enforcement officers who wish to attend. Sgt. Gibson, a Drug Recognition Expert, will be one of the two instructors.”

The course was intended to build upon skills learned in Standard Field Sobriety Testing training in which law enforcement officers would have focused on identifying and assessing motorists suspected of driving under the influence, Smith explained. The purpose was to reduce the amount of impaired drivers, and in turn, lessen impaired driving collisions.

The two-day ARIDE course was free of charge for qualified law enforcement officers. Prior DUI – Standard Field Sobriety Testing training was required.

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

Whereabouts of Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton still in question

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Towns County Sheriff

HIAWASSEE, Ga – “Where is Sheriff Clinton?” has been a resounding question in the community for many months, if not years, and it is an inquiry no one seems capable, or willing, to answer. FetchYourNews (FYN) began looking into the schedule of Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton in late February after rumors began to swirl on the lead lawman’s whereabouts, leading to an editorial article which unfortunately offered little insight. Three months later, the query into how the elected official spends his time mostly remains a mystery.

Sheriff Chris Clinton

Sheriff Chris Clinton’s on-duty call log hours from March, 2018 to March, 2019

On March 15, FYN filed an open records request with Towns County 911, seeking information on the sheriff’s on-duty call log for the previous year. Records show that Sheriff Clinton served less than 31 hours on-duty, and over 8801 hours off-duty, in a year’s time. Sheriff Clinton responded to a scarce eight calls in the annual period reviewed, two of which occurred after our story broke. Towns County Sheriff’s Office logged approximately 25,000 calls during the period in question, although many thousands were the result of business patrols and license plate checks.
Seeking answers, FYN filed an open records request with the Towns County Sheriff’s Office to review the chief officer’s annual calendar immediately thereafter.
FYN was met with the following, emailed reply from Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton:

“In reference to your open records request, the Office of Sheriff does not maintain a calendar for the sheriff.  The sheriff’s wife maintains a family calendar that the sheriff appears on.  The sheriff is the only person who can provide the information requested. It is estimated that the request will require 91.25 hours of the sheriff’s time at the sheriff’s hourly rate of $7.38/hour to perform the task requested.  The estimate is based on retrieval and printing for redaction, redacting, and scanning into an electronic form.

 

“There are an estimated 365 pages of material to be printed at $0.10 / page,” Clinton continued. “Estimated cost to fulfill the request: Sheriff’s time to access, retrieve, print, redact, and scan to electronic form per your request — approximately 91.25 hours @ $7.38/hour = $ 673.43  (You will not be charged for the first 15 minutes.) 365 pages @ $0.10 / page = $36.50. Total estimated cost = $709.93.”

Towns County Sheriff's Office

11Alive Chief Investigator Brendan Keefe’s social media page

In lieu of paying what FYN considered an excessive fee for public information, FYN sent an additional request to the Towns County Sheriff to visually review the orginal copy of the elected official’s appointments, a request which went ignored. On FYN’s third attempt, which was carbon copied to 11Alive News in Atlanta, Towns County Sheriff’s Administrator Vicki Ellis referred FYN to Towns County Sheriff’s Executive Secretary Shirley Clinton, the sheriff’s mother, who scheduled an appointment to review the calendar housed in the sheriff’s courthouse office.

An inspection of the calendar on May 22 proved futile as page after page revealed no entries. Occassional meetings appeared, along with multiple, weekly radio station appearances, and mandatory training engagements. Citizen Law Enforcement Academy (CLEA) appointments were listed throughout, a group which consists primarily of retired residents that the sheriff has referred to in the past as personal “lobbyists.”

Sheriff Chris Clinton

An entry on the sheriff’s sparse calendar

Dozens upon dozens of citizens, government employees – including many law enforcement officers – and media sources report habitual absences from Sheriff Chris Clinton at the Towns County Courthouse and Towns County Detention Center, along with an inability to receive replies from the sheriff via email or phone call when questions or issues arise. Towns County’s FYN reporter and 11Alive News Chief Investigator Brendan Keefe have attempted to contact the sheriff on numerous occassions, in order to disseminate information sought by the citizens, to no avail.
11Alive News is scheduled to broadcast an in-depth segment on the Towns County Sheriff’s Office, in relation to the fatal accident of Hiawassee resident Terry Silvers, on Sunday, May 26, at 6 pm.

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

UPDATED: Mistrial declared due to Towns County Sheriff’s drug poster

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Sheriff Chris Clinton

UPDATED: FYN spoke with a courthouse official who confirmed the mistrial was pronounced by Superior Court Judge Raymond George, based on his ruling that the defendant may not receive a fair trial due to the placement of the arrest poster in the Towns County Courthouse, a venue where trials are held. Jurors were reported as recognizing the defendant, who was charged with possession of methamphetamine, upon entry into the courtroom. According to our source, a new trial is expected to take place.

HIAWASSEE, Ga. – FetchYourNews (FYN) received credible information pertaining to a court case which was rejected last week due to an action taken by the Towns County Sheriff’s Office. FYN is in the process of collecting the details surrounding the situation, and has filed a media request with the Enotah Circuit District Attorney’s Office. The jury trial was reported to FYN as a mistrial due to an “Operation Trial Run” poster prominately placed in the Towns County Courthouse which displayed photographs of numerous suspects arrested on drug charges by the sheriff’s office in past months. According to several sources, jurors viewed the poster in question prior to the trial, thus tainting the case, as defendants are presumed innocent prior to a court’s verdict.

Towns County Sheriff’s Office conducted the drug operation dubbed “Operation Trial Run” consisting of a seven month drug investigation in which undercover agents, along with uniformed patrol officers, arrested suspects throughout the county on various drug and other related offenses. The operation was a several month evaluation, beginning in May, 2018, running through January, 2019, with the department using an in-house drug agent to aid in the investigations.

During the seven month “Operation Trial Run” investigation, 37 suspects were arrested on over 150 drug and additional various charges. Numerous search warrants were acquired and executed throughout Towns County during the operation.  A total of more than $81,000 worth of illegal drugs were taken off the streets and from residences throughout the county.    

Operation Trial Run” resulted in the seizures of a residential home, vehicles, cash, and firearms valued at more than $322,000.  Once the seizures have been successfully completed and awarded back to the sheriff’s office, the funds can be used for law enforcement purposes to combat illegal activity within the county.     

According to an April statement from Towns County Sheriff’s Office, “Operation Trial Run” proved to be “very successful.” The agency stated that it has and will continue to operate with an in-house drug agent, and additional suspects have since been arrested and more seizures made, with other arrests and seizures forthcoming in the near future.

All suspects reported as arrested by law enforcement are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Feature Image: Photograph of the poster in question, released to FYN by Towns County Sheriff’s Office in April.

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

New information on Towns County Sheriff’s Office training discovered

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Towns County Sheriff's Office

HIAWASSEE, Ga. – FetchYourNews (FYN) opened an investigation into the death of Terry Samuel Silvers, a father of six known to suffer from substance abuse, shortly after an accident claimed the Hiawassee resident’s life Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. The fatal collision left two victims injured, an eyewitness traumatized, and the community questioning whether Towns County Sheriff’s Office should have done more to prevent the tragedy.

Towns County Deputy Corporal Gregory Joseph responded to two prior accidents involving Silvers, releasing the now-deceased on both occassions without charges, despite widespread knowledge of Silvers’ drug use, and testimonies from several witnesses who claimed Silvers was obviously under the influence of intoxicants at the time of both incidents.

New information recently updated by Georgia’s Peace Officer’s Standards and Training (POST) reveals that the deputy in question attended six hours of drug-impared detection training through the Prosecuting Attorney’s Council of Georgia (PAC) a week prior to a late-November, 2018, roll-over accident involving Silvers. As in the case of a subsequent incident in which Deputy Joseph responded, occurring on the evening before Silvers’ death, Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN) was conducted, a test which does not properly indicate drug impairment.

A two-day Advanced Roadside Impairment Detection Enforcement (ARIDE) course for law enforcement is scheduled in Hiawassee next week. According to a document obtained by FYN on May 16 from the Georgia Public Safety Training Center (GPSTC), there is no record of Towns County Sheriff’s Office deputies listed as upcoming participants. Of note, four Hiawassee police officers plan to attend the training, two of whom trained in the past.

During the course of our investigation, FYN conducted numerous interviews with former deputies of the Towns County Sheriff’s Office who unanimously cited lack of training and leadership as reasons for their resignations.

As seen in Corporal Joseph’s body camera footage from Nov. 27, witness Belinda Munger is heard telling the deputy that Silvers had a habit of driving under the influence of intoxicants, posing a danger to innocent citizens. Also in question is a telephone call answered by the responding deputy during the incident.

“I was woken up to the sound of shattering glass,” Munger told FYN, shortly after Silvers’ death. “I jumped out of bed, ran to my kitchen to see what was going on. I looked out my window and saw Terry’s truck hanging off my bank, almost going through my mother’s house. I called 911 while putting my shoes on to head out the door. Terry had gotten off in the ditch, taken out the neighbor’s mailbox, continuing down the ditch, hitting tree stumps which caused his truck to flip. He was so heavily medicated, he did not realize that he had even flipped his truck.

“He asked if someone could pull his truck out so he could go home. Officer Joseph arrives on scene. I explained what had happened and let them know that it was obvious; he was under the influence of pills. The officer asked Terry for his ID. Terry stumbles to get to his vehicle, where he searched for a long while for his ID and insurance. I asked the officer if he saw Terry stumbling as he walked to his vehicle, but the officer did not even acknowledge what I said. Another officer arrived on scene and I advised him of what was going on, also that they needed to test him. I was very open with letting them know how ridiculous it was that they did not think anything was wrong with Terry. It was very obvious, he couldn’t even hardly keep his eyes open and was slurring his speech.

“The ambulance arrived, and Terry refused to let him transport or check him,” Munger continued. “They as well could tell he was medicated and nothing would be done. The other officer advised Officer Joseph that I was upset, and that I wanted him tested. Officer Joseph came back to tell me he had checked out fine, but I knew different. Then, I asked both officers, ‘Will it take him killing someone for you all to do something with him?’ I told them how ridiculous it was that, once again, they were letting him go free knowing how he was under the influence of pills… Later that day, I reached out to Sheriff Clinton one last time, and left a message with his secretary. But like usual, there was no attempt of a return phone call from the sheriff.” Munger can be heard in the video, telling the deputy that Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton should be contacted before Silvers’ “kills someone.”

Approximately three months later, the evening prior to the fatal crash, Silvers was involved in an additional accident on Bugscuffle Road in which Deputy Joseph responded. Again, Silvers was released by Towns County Sheriff’s Office. The property damaged in the Feb. 22, belongs to neighboring Union County Sheriff’s Office Lieutenant Daren “Bear” Osborn. “Based on my training and experience, 32 years, I recognized (Terry) was in no shape to drive due to his condition,” the off-duty deputy explained in March. “What strikes me as odd is that an alco sensor and HGN was done which does not indicate drug use.” Osborn described Silvers as exhibiting confused behavior while showing evident signs of impaired judgment.

An “alco sensor” is commonly known as breathalizer. Family members and friends of Silvers stated that Terry was not a drinker, but recognized in the community and to law enforcement as an opioid user. North Carolina Medical Examiner’s Office did not perform a post-mortem screen on Silvers for narcotics, however, opting to only conduct ethanol testing for alcohol.

John Bagley, a witness who spoke with FYN shortly after the tragedy agreed with Lt. Osborn, stating that Silvers was clearly unfit to drive on the night prior to his death. “(Terry) wrecked right across from my house,” Bagley said. “He was in no shape to be driving. I think there should have been additional tests done. It could have saved his life.”

WXIA – 11 (11Alive News) will broadcast a televised investigation into Terry Silvers’ death, beginning Tuesday, May 21, at 11 pm. An in-depth segment will follow Sunday, May 26.

Below is the disturbing 911 audio previously released by FYN from the night of the fatal crash…

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23f_zncSj5g[/embedyt]

 

 

 

 

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

11Alive News completes investigation into Towns County Sheriff’s Office involvement in fatal crash

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Terry Silvers

HIAWASSSEE, Ga. – Nearly twelve weeks after a North Carolina motor vehicle accident left one man dead, two victims injured, and an eyewitness traumatized, WXIA-TV 11 (11Alive News) in Atlanta, in cooperation with FetchYourNews (FYN), has completed an in-depth investigation into the circumstances surrounding the tragic event. A broadcast is expected to be televised on WXIA-TV 11 in coming days. The initial segment is scheduled for release Tuesday, May 21, at 11 pm. A detailed report will follow Sunday, May 26.

On the evening of Saturday, Feb. 23, a head-on vehicle collision took the life of Terry Samuel Silvers, a Hiawassee native, leaving a grandmother and granddaughter wounded, and Heather Segars, a good samaritan who attempted to prevent the deadly crash by summoning Towns County authorities, devastated. Public outrage flared upon learning the facts surrounding the fatal collision, prompting the Atlanta-based news channel to conduct a dual investigation.

Terry Silvers

Copy of Terry Silvers’ toxicology report

Renowned WXIA-TV 11 Chief Investigator Brendan Keefe contacted FYN shortly after the viral-release of the 911 audio recording in which the frantic caller, Heather Segars, pleads for law enforcement to respond to an erratic driver, later identified to dispatchers as Terry Silvers, while headed westbound on State Route 76 in Young Harris, GA. A Towns County Sheriff’s Office cruiser’s siren can be heard bypassing distraught Segars, who pursued Silvers’ vehicle across the state line until the time of the fatal impact, in response to a previous call which two officers had adequately covered.

The deputy in question, Corporal Gregory Joseph – also known as officer “112” – responded to two prior accidents involving Silvers, one of which occurred the night before the fatal crash. Despite testimony from numerous witnesses who stated Silvers clearly appeared to be impaired – including an adament account from an on-scene, veteran law enforcement officer from a neighboring county – Silvers was again released to return to the roadways without facing charges. According to Georgia’s Police Officer Standard Training (POST) records, Corporal Joseph has never participated in roadside drug-detection training, nor has the deputy received sufficent DUI training in over a decade.

Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton issued a statement to the county’s legal organ in the weeks following the highly controversial accident, denying departmental responsibilty, much to the dismay of many of the citiizens the lead lawman had sworn to serve.

FYN recently received a requested copy of Silvers’ toxicology report from the North Carolina Medical Examiner’s Office which revealed Silvers did not have alcohol in his system at the time of his death. A screening for additional substances was not conducted, however, despite widespread knowledge that Silvers battled an opioid addiction. Family, friends, and law enforcement officers attested that Silvers was a well-known substance abuser in the community. North Carolina authorities stated that in the event of a death when the manner is apparent – such as a vehicle fatality – toxicology screenings are typically limited to alcohol detection.

FYN spoke with 911 caller Heather Segars on the morning of May 15, inquiring into her current thoughts and condition.

“I’m holding on with a very thin rope every day,” Segars shared. “I still have anxiety today. I’ve had to be put on Valium. Some days are better than others.” Segars said she holds Towns County Sheriff’s Office responsible for the cost of her psychiatric treatment and the lost wages which ensued as a result of the accident, but foremost, Segars said what she wants most is for Towns County Sheriff Chris Clinton to be held accountable. “I want to know why Sheriff Clinton won’t take responsibilty. I would like to see change in the department. We deserve someone with experience on issues like this. I would like to see Clinton resign. I’d also like a public apology from his wife for posting unrelated things about my past under his social media account after the accident.”

FYN continues to offer a platform for the sheriff to comment.

Continue to follow FYN as the release of the WXIA-TV 11 investigation approaches.

Feature Image: Terry Silvers

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

Additional methamphetamine distribution arrest made by authorities

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Sonya Taylor Hiawassee

HIAWASSEE, Ga. –  On Thursday, May 9, Sonya Taylor was arrested without incident on warrants for drug charges related to a search warrant which occurred April 20. Sonya Taylor, 43, of Hiawassee, was arrested and charged with the following:

  •            One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Possession of Methamphetamine with Intent to Distribute)

  •           One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Possession of Methamphetamine)

  •           One Count of Drug Related Objects

As previously reported, Towns County Sheriff’s Office deputies and investigators executed a search warrant on Saturday, April 20, at a residence off of Mill Creek Road in Hiawassee, Georgia. At that time, investigators arrested Willis Dyer, 60, of Hiawassee, on the following charges:

Willis Dyer

Willis Dyer

  •           One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Possession of Methamphetamine with Intent to Distribute)

  •           One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Possession of Methamphetamine)

  •           One Count of Drug Related Objects

According  to the Towns County Sheriff’s Office, the case remains under active investigation. The case will be forwarded to the Enotah Circuit District Attorney’s Office for prosecution. All suspects are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Feature Image: Sonya Taylor of Hiawassee

 

 

 

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

Sheriff’s Office arrests Hiawassee man for manufacturing marijuana

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Towns County drug use

HIAWASSEE, Ga. – Towns County Sheriff’s Office deputies and investigators discovered illegal drugs at a residence searched Friday, April 26 on Foster Road in Hiawassee.

Roy Lee Moneypenny,

                            Roy Lee Moneypenny

Investigators arrested Roy Lee Moneypenny, 62, of Hiawassee, on the following charges:

  •  One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Manufacturing Marijuana)

  •  One Count of Violation of Georgia Controlled Substance Act

(Possession of Marijuana)

  •  One Count of Possession of Drug Related Objects

The investigation is currently active and ongoing. Additional charges are possible.  The case will be forwarded to the Enotah Circuit District Attorney’s Office for prosecution. Moneypenny is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

While medical marijuana was legalized in Georgia, cultivation and use of the plant without a physician’s approval remains illicit. Georgia has allowed patients suffering from severe seizures and other illnesses to use cannabis oil since 2015. The state did not allow in-state cultivation, however, and thousands of individuals on the program’s registry risked defying federal law by transporting the drug across state lines. Advocates supported medical marijuana expansion, although the measure involved significant obsticals before cannabis oil could be manufactured and distributed in the state. Six private companies were permitted to grow medical marijuana, but the dispensaries could not operate without a state board license. April 17 marked Governor Brian Kemp’s historic signing of House Bill 324, which allows for legal cultivation and sale of cannabis oil in Georgia.

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

On-Scene Exclusive: Towns County holds active shooter drill, tests medical response

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Towns County EMS

HIAWASSEE, Ga. – Realistic is the most accurate adjective to describe an active shooter drill which took place in Towns County on the morning of Friday, May 3, 2019. The full-scale training, directed jointly by the Georgia Mountains Healthcare Coalition and the Northeast Georgia Health System, was designed primarily to test the response of emergency medical providers.

Towns County active shooter drill

A Towns County deputy stands beside a subdued “shooter”

The mock scenario took place outside of Dr. Samuel Church’s office, located behind Zaxby’s restaurant, off State Route 76 in eastern Hiawassee. “Victims” were staged – complete with graphic, cosmetic injuries – at various points throughout the crime scene. Some were in open view, while others were in less obvious locations. The narrative, previously reported by FYN, read that two, escaped inmates – members of the brutal “Ghostface Gang” – shot innocent bystanders outside of the medical provider’s office.

Towns County EMS

A young “gunshot victim” awaits emergency medical treatment

At 9:11 am, Towns County 911 dispatched emergency responders to the scene of the simulated crisis. Within one minute, law enforcement officers from Hiawassee Police Department and Towns County Sheriff’s Office arrived at the masacre, blocking the roadway with patrol vehicles before “fatally” subduing two shooters in skilled succession. One the threat had been neutralized, four Towns County Sheriff’s deputies secured a perimeter around the scene, and Hiawassee Police Chief Paul Smith could be seen directing a hysterical actor to a suitable location. Along with civilians, a law enforcement officer was said to have been “fatally shot” during the mock attack.

Towns County EMS

Brandi Garrett, a resident of Hayesville, volunteered to play the role of a fatally injured “victim”

Towns County Fire and Rescue responders soon arrived at the location, lights flashing and sirens screaming, rendering aid while triaging “victims” according to the severity of their injuries. “Victims” who were fatally wounded were quickly tagged to alert incoming responders of their expired conditions.

Towns County Emergency Medical Service (EMS) paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) raced to the crisis, providing urgent treatment on multiple casualties. Three ambulances transported the “victims” to Chatuge Regional Hospital in Hiawassee, and three of the “patients” warranted an air-flight to trauma centers. FYN spoke with EMS Director Ken Nicholson during the drill as he assisted a role-player who suffered a gunshot wound to the abdominal area. “The training was laid out good,” the lead paramedic said. “The victims were scattered in different places, and it went well, working with available resources.”

“I think it went well,” agreed Hiawassee Police Chief Paul Smith, once the exercise had concluded. “It was about as realistic as we could have hoped. While the drill was designed mainly to test medical response, the addition of law enforcement created an authentic scenario. The drill was realistic, and the stress involved helped induce the right mindset.” Chief Smith was the commanding officer of the drill, as it occurred within the city’s jurisdiction. Smith explained that in a real-life situation at that particular location, Main Street would have been partitioned to eliminate traffic, and the media would have likely been staged at a nearby plaza. Georgia Bureau of Investigation would have been tasked with investigating the tragic scene. Towns County Sheriff’s Captain Jim Couch explained that the Towns County Courthouse and Towns County Schools simulated a lock-down for the sake of security during the drill.

Towns County Fire and Rescue

Towns County Fire and Rescue prepares a “victim” for transport

Towns County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) Director Brandon Walls observed the agencies’ response techniques, noting areas that could benefit from additional training. Walls described the drill as “quality,” adding that EMA plans to “hotwash” items with the fire department. Clearview at Chatuge Clinic Director Wendell Farmer was present throughout the exercise, along with registered nurse and paramedic, Sherry Minchew, an artistic participant who created the detailed, physical effects on the “injured” role-players.

An active shooter drill was simultaneously held in Blairsville at the farmers market venue, with “patient” transports arriving at Union General Hospital.

Feature Photo: Towns County EMS transports a “gunshot victim” to an awaiting ambulance for treatment

 

Author

Robin H. Webb

Robin can be reached by dialing 706-487-9027 or contacted via email at Robin@FetchYourNews.com --- News tips will be held in strict confidence upon request.

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